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Meet Our Team Of Depression Psychiatrists

Overview

When a depressed individual takes rehabilitation care, they end up making lifestyle changes and learning various emotional regulation and other coping skills that helps them manage their life at work, at home, and in relationships. However, outside of the rehabilitation setting, the individual may find it challenging to go back to their normal life and adjust to the environment. It is possible for them to experience stressors from life that may lead to a relapse of a depressive episode. In addition, for some cases, regular intake of psychiatric medications are required, and failing to do so could be another trigger for a relapse. These factors highlight the importance of post rehabilitation care for depression.

Post rehabilitation care allows an individual to prevent a relapse, maintain their recovered emotional state, allows them to maintain functionality in life, and provides them with coping tools in response to inevitable environmental stressors and triggers.
EXPERT TALKS

Depression Psychiatry: What is it and how can it help you?

PATIENTS RECOVERY STORIES

Living with Depression and Overcoming Them: Survivor Stories

OUR FACILITIES

Our Infrastructure, Care Facilities and Strong Community Support Ensure Better Patient Outcomes

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What are the benefits of Post Rehabilitation Care for Depression?

It helps the individual maintain good mental health after recovery from depression and helps reduce the risks of relapses. 

How does it work?

The individual may be asked to engage in regular psychiatric consultations (if required) and therapy sessions on a weekly, fortnightly, or a monthly basis, depending on how well they are doing. 

How many numbers of sessions are required? 

It depends on how well the individual is able to manage different aspects of their life outside of the rehabilitation setting. Appointments with the psychologists and psychiatrists may be more frequent in the beginning, and may become lesser as the individual finds themselves coping well.